L'Chaim Foods kosher products are now available at The Market in the San Francisco Twitter building. (Photo/Wikimedia-Fastily CC BY-SA 4.0)
L'Chaim Foods kosher products are now available at The Market in the San Francisco Twitter building. (Photo/Wikimedia-Fastily CC BY-SA 4.0)

Kosher sushi comes to S.F.’s Mid-Market area; immigrant chefs share in East Bay

L’Chaim Foods announced that its sushi is now available at The Market, located inside the Twitter building at 1355 Market St, S.F., bringing a kosher option to the Mid-Market area. L’Chaim Foods, which began as L’Chaim Sushi in 2013, was founded by Rabbi Alex Shandrovsky, a Russian-born, San Francisco-raised rabbi who developed a love for sushi before he became religious and started keeping kosher. L’Chaim sushi is now a staple at Jewish events throughout the Bay Area.

Shandrovsky has since returned to Israel but is still involved with L’Chaim. Running its daily operations now is CEO Rebecca Charles, whom Shandrovsky met at Edwins Leadership and Restaurant Institute in Cleveland (a culinary re-entry program featured recently in the Oscar-nominated short “Knife Skills”). Charles has over 20 years of experience in the restaurant industry and was excited by the challenge of working for L’Chaim, not only because it meant moving to San Francisco but also because she has a Jewish grandmother.


Slow Food East Bay is kicking off a series celebrating immigrant food traditions as a way of bringing people together. On March 31, Jewish chef Jesse Bloom of Sacred Kitchen and ITK Culinary will lead an interactive event featuring eight immigrant chefs sharing their food traditions and cultures. Chef Aliza Grayevsky Somekh will be representing Israel. Other chefs will represent Mexico, Korea, India, Iran, Cuba, Senegal and Chile. Click here for info and tickets.

Alix Wall
Alix Wall

Alix Wall is a contributing editor to J. She is also the founder of the Illuminoshi: The Not-So-Secret Society of Bay Area Jewish Food Professionals and is writer/producer of a documentary-in-progress called "The Lonely Child."