"Not To Change Consecrated Animals (From One Type Of Offering To Another)," from Archie Rand's "The 613" series
"Not To Change Consecrated Animals (From One Type Of Offering To Another)," from Archie Rand's "The 613" series

Jazz, poetry, S.F. Jewish Film Fest and other best bets

A little art, a little music, some poetry — the weekend beckons with plenty of opportunities to boost your cultural IQ, and have fun while you’re at it.


Start at the Contemporary Jewish Museum, where noted artist Archie Rand will give an intimate, lunchtime tour of his just opened exhibition, “The 613.” Rand’s 613 20-by-16-inch paintings on canvas reinvent the biblical commandments, or mitzvot, in vivid colors and comic-book style. Rand will talk about his influences and inspirations, focusing on a selection of paintings. His talk, free with museum admission, takes place from 12-12:30 p.m. on Friday, July 21 at the museum, 736 Mission Street in San Francisco. For more information, see thecjm.org.


Next: “Stay Amazed: A Celebration of Poetry and Music,” on Saturday, July 22. Berkeley’s arts ambassador and Judaica artist Susan Duhan Felix will host a celebration of the arts featuring poetry readings, musical performances by artists such as Lester Chambers (of Chambers Brothers fame), and a slew of others. There’s dancing, too, with Saul Goodman’s Klezmer Band. The party begins at 7:30 p.m. at the JCC East Bay, 1414 Walnut St., Berkeley. Tickets are $8-$12.


On Sunday, June 23, how about a movie followed by live jazz? It’s a highlight of the two-week-long San Francisco Jewish Film Festival, which opened Thursday night at the Castro. First comes the 6:45 p.m. screening of “Body and Soul: An American Bridge,” a documentary about the Jewish origins of the jazz standard “Body and Soul.” Afterward, the Marcus Shelby Quartet jazz band performs. Both take place at the Castro Theatre, 429 Castro St., San Francisco. $18 for the doubleheader. For more information and the complete schedule of the festival, see sfjff.org.

harris-liz
Liz Harris

Liz Harris is a J. contributor. She was J.'s culture editor from 2012-2018.