Survivor IDs ‘anonymous’ girl in Anne Frank photo — his wife

Friday, July 23, 2004 | by

joe eskenazi



People glancing at the June 18 j. cover story on a new traveling exhibit featuring many never-before-seen photos of Anne Frank most likely focused on the iconic diary writer.

But not Bernard Judd.

When the 83-year-old Las Vegas resident saw the cover photo featuring Anne and unidentified friends, he had only one thought — “That’s my wife!”

Judd’s wife of 42 years, the former Eva Goldberg, is the cute little girl with the doll and dark-colored dress on the left of the photo. Anne is on the right and mutual friend Sanne Lederman is in the middle. Eva’s mother, Helene Goldberg, snapped the photo, according to Judd.

Eva, who was born in Goerlitz, Germany, often traveled with her family to Amsterdam. As native German speakers, Eva and Anne quickly became friends. Judd still has a childhood notebook of his wife’s in which Anne wrote a page-long, signed note. It is one of the few Anne Frank artifacts still in private hands.

Eva Judd died seven years ago in Las Vegas at age 68. Anne, of course, died in the Holocaust, as did Sanne.

Eva escaped her friends’ fate when the Goldberg family finagled a late transport to England. After a year there, the family relocated to Sacramento.

Eva met Judd, a Czechoslovakian-born survivor of Buchenwald who lost his parents and five siblings in the Holocaust, on a trip to Los Angeles in 1955. They were married within six months. Eva worked at the Department of Motor Vehicles and her husband had a dry-cleaning business. They moved to Las Vegas in 1995.

In their retirement, Eva and Bernard Judd went on a cruise-trip to Russia a dozen years ago, and on the way back stopped in Amsterdam. Judd claims he gave the photo of his wife, Sanne and Anne to officials at Anne Frank House, “who didn’t know what do with us.”

Since then, he’s seen the photo in magazines and four books, and “I have them all.” Eva’s picture is also featured in the U.S. Memorial Holocaust Museum in Washington, D.C.

Judd’s friend and neighbor, former Bay Area resident Jerry Klonoff, passed him the copy of j. “As soon as he saw the pictures, he gave me the magazine,” said Judd.

“He said, ‘They don’t know Eva’s name. You better call them.’”

So, this week, he did.