U.S. REPORT

Friday, December 10, 1999 | by

NEW YORK (JTA)—The FBI is investigating the attempted firebombing of a Reno synagogue as a possible hate crime.

A Molotov cocktail was thrown at the window of Temple Emanu- El last week. But it failed to break the glass, falling to the ground and leaving some bricks under the window singed.

It is reportedly the third incident at the synagogue this year.

Hillary Clinton urged to take stand on spy

NEW YORK (JTA)—Hundreds of Jewish demonstrators rallied at Hillary Rodham Clinton's U.S. Senate campaign headquarters in New York, demanding that she call on the president to release convicted Israeli spy Jonathan Pollard.

Sunday's rally was the second in recent months in which pro-Pollard activists called on the first lady to state her position on whether Pollard should be freed.

Nintendo will pull Pokemon swastika

NEW YORK (JTA)—Nintendo of America, the makers of the popular Pokemon cards, said it will discontinue a card with an illustration of a swastika after receiving complaints from Jewish families.

One of the Japanese-language cards, not meant for sale in the United States, depicts a red "manji," or swastika. In Japan, where the symbol predates the Nazis by centuries, it means good fortune and can also represent a Buddhist temple.

Library of Congress lists looted books

WASHINGTON (JTA)—Following a recent inquiry by the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, the Library of Congress acknowledged that after World War II it received 5,708 books that the Nazis had looted from Jewish Holocaust victims.

The library said it received the books from Jewish Cultural Reconstruction Inc., which sought to find homes after the war for 500,000 books that were deemed heirless. Robert Waite of the Justice Department's Office of Special Investigations said he found no evidence the books were acquired through improper means.

Wisconsin resident facing deportation

NEW YORK (JTA)—A U.S. federal appeals court upheld the deportation of a retired Wisconsin stone cutter who once served as a concentration camp guard.

The court ruled Dec. 2 that a 1994 court had properly ordered the deportation of Anton Tittjung, 75, because he had served as an armed member of the Nazi SS at the Mauthausen concentration camp.

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