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Thursday, March 13, 2014 | return to: supplement, celebrations


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celebrations |  It’s the thought that counts, but make your present count, too

by jacob kamaras , jns.org

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A Kiddush cup fountain can be a creative Jewish wedding gift.
A Kiddush cup fountain can be a creative Jewish wedding gift.
Not another challah board! That’s the collective cry heard ’round the Jewish world when newlyweds receive a Judaica gift they already have. Don’t be that friend — follow my simple “do’s” and “don’ts” for Jewish wedding gifts.

First, the do’s:

• Be creative. There are inventive spins on Judaica items that are sure to leave a more lasting impression than their traditional counterparts. Kiddush cup? How about a Kiddush cup fountain instead? It includes a center cup as well as 8 to 12 matching small cups, and when the reciter of Kiddush pours the wine from the center cup into the base of the fountain, the wine trickles down into the small cups. This avoids the clumsiness of pouring Kiddush wine for each person at a large Shabbat meal, and perhaps more importantly, the streamlined process routinely elicits oohs and aahs from guests.

Challah board? How about a challah board breadbasket? This challah board transforms itself into a basket for distributing challah to guests after it is cut, keeping the Shabbat table uncluttered.

• Think practically. What Judaica does the couple really need around the house? More specifically, what does the couple need more than one of? A mezuzah (with a decorative case) immediately comes to mind, given the multiple doorposts in Jewish homes calling for one. Even more practical (and more memorable) is providing the glass cup that the groom will break with his foot under the chuppah.

• Give cash. Are you thinking that cash isn’t sentimental enough, and that the couple won’t “remember you” if you don’t give a unique gift? Don’t talk yourself into that myth. You’ll be remembered quite fondly for your cash gift, with which the newlyweds can buy anything they desire.

Now the don’ts:

• Be a copycat. The couple will likely get multiple challah boards, challah covers, menorahs, seder plates, and the like. Don’t join the fray. Be original. Now, I admit, it would be quite unfortunate if everyone followed my advice and the couple ended up with none of these hallowed Judaica fixtures.

• Compete with close relatives. The couple’s parents or other close relatives may purchase them silver Shabbat candlesticks or a Kiddush cup, or the bride and groom may have had these items passed down in their family. Don’t even think for a second that you can compete with bubbe and zayde!

• Duplicate the registry. This goes for non-Judaica items, and was a major pet peeve for us when we got married in 2013. “Duplicating” the couple’s registry — for instance, getting dishes or silverware not listed on the registry — ensures that the couple will be getting something they don’t need.

But honestly, these are all just pointers. Any gift is deeply appreciated, and it’s the thought that counts. At the end of the day, it isn’t the presents, but your presence — at the wedding, if you can be there, or through your continued friendship — that matters


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